Thursday, December 30, 2010
Creativity Cannot Be Domesticated

Last week I spent a whole day out in the Slocan Valley, sitting and writing with a group of women. We sat on a porch, looking over a pool, fields full of trees and flowers, and the green mountains across the valley. The silence got deeper and deeper. We sat, we wrote, we read out loud, and worked with each other. We walked, stretched, and wrote some more. The whole day passed like this, and it was good. All my life I’ve noticed this—that when we allow ourselves to be creative, a deep contentment fills our being. The first thing I want to say about creativity is that is belongs to all of us. We are deeply embedded in a relentlessly creative universe. The most natural way we can be is intensely creative. That’s our authentic nature. But we started to believe something else: creativity is for the gifted, for the special, for the other person, not for me. Have you ever had thought like this? Have you turned away from the creative side of yourself? From the openness inside you that just wants to flow, to express itself fully. I’ve heard so many people speak to me about this …

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Thursday, December 30, 2010
Presence and Creativity Could Save Your Life

I’ve always had a deep sense that presence and creativity are not really luxuries, but an essential part of life. This inner knowing has been confirmed by a great book I’m reading, called, “Deep Survival.” It contains many well- documented tales of survival-in the wilderness, at sea, in prisoner of war camps, and in the twin towers of 9/11. It turns out that the people who survive are not necessarily the well- trained, experienced ones. The survivors are the ones who are able to deal with the reality right in front of them in a creative, flexible way. The ones who die are holding on to a map inside their minds. They have an idea of what is happening, and the idea stands between them and the truth of what is actually going on. They cannot meet the moment, the situation as it is, and respond to it. So the more we live life according to our maps, our ideas, the less we are able to be present to our immediate, direct experience. And the more we can respond creatively, flexibly, to the demands of the moment, the more likely it is that we will walk out of the situation …

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Thursday, December 30, 2010
Waiting for Fire

Behind my T.V. in the bedroom, are four pots of geraniums, sleeping through the winter. Three are pale green, one has no leaves at all. I water them once in a while, just enough to keep them alive until spring. I love that they bloom there in secret, behind the T.V. where nobody sees them but me. I wonder about the quiet plant, the leafless one. Will it come alive again, under blue sky and warm rain? I feel curious about the secret movement of life. Life that sprouts in silence, hidden away, forgotten, but not dead. A seed can sit for a long time, before it awakens. Some seeds only sprout when fire comes upon them. What seeds do we carry, that wait for fire to ignite them?

Thursday, December 30, 2010
Notes from a personal coaching session on love and intimacy

·Freedom and Truth-2 core aspects of love The nature of love is that it gives total freedom to the other person. This does not mean that they can do whatever they want, when they want. This is a very immature understanding of freedom. The kind of freedom we are speaking of respects their basic human rights: Their right to keep private whatever they want to Their right to speak or remain silent. Their right to take their own space when they need to-ie leave the room , even when you are wanting to engage them in conversation Their right to go out and spend time with friends, without having to report back to you. · Building trust-another key aspect of love Every time we promise something, or make an agreement with our partner, and do not come through, we erode the space of trust between us. Healing broken trust can sometimes take a long time, but the process is very simple: Do not make a single promise that you do not intend to keep. And be sure that both you and your partner are clear about the specific nature of the promise or agreement. For example, don’t just say you …

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Thursday, December 30, 2010
The Acceptance of Difficulty

The Acceptance of Difficulty A couple of comments:  re “humans addicted to struggle”.  I also feel that we in the western world are addicted to all things going our way, that we should always be happy, be fulfilled–if not we often try to escape, resort to alcohol or take a pill.  I’ve had a big learning in this area and have come to accept that parts of life are difficult (what we take on as alive human beings). The acceptance of difficulty, defeat and pain in our lives plus the awareness that we have a choice- either to indulge in the negativity or to let go, accept and be proactive and realize that this too shall pass seems to eliminate the struggle aspect.  Perhaps this is when sweet vulnerability comes in.  I love your imagery of babes in water…no struggle, no splashing around, just perfect balance in their environment. Marilyn McCombe, Nelson, B.C. Canada

Friday, December 24, 2010
p3

p3 This beautifier can process your messy or compacted javascript, making it all neatly and consistently formatted and readable. You can always see the latest version of the code in github, and you can download the beautifier for local use (zip, tar.gz) as well. Unpacking javascript The beautifier has a simple unpacker for Dean Edward’s packer. To unpack javascript, paste (p,a,c,k,e,d) scripts and they’ll hopefully get decoded. Your feedback is welcome. Formatting from command-line To beautify from the command-line you can use provided beautify-cl.js script, using Rhino javascript engine. See the file contents for the details. Fiddler This popular web debugging proxy for Windows has a Javascript Formatter addon (based on this beautifier) which can reformat javascript on the fly. Vim Aj3423 converted the script to vimscript — and so now there is a vim plugin for the quality javascript beautifying. Other nice things If you’re writing javascript code, JSLint is a really fine piece of software, too. You don’t have to follow its recommendations blindly, but understanding what it says about your code can greatly improve your skills. This beautifier can process your messy or compacted javascript, making it all neatly and consistently formatted and readable. You can always …

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Friday, December 24, 2010
p2

p2

Friday, December 24, 2010
p1

new post to test

Friday, December 10, 2010
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